Term Card: Autumn Semester 2014

So while everyone has been swanning off for summer The Literific council and a few keen members have been busy deciding the motions for the upcoming QUB term – Autumn 2014.

We, at The Literific, hope you have an amazing summer whether you’re snorkeling in Bangkok, off to Washington-Ireland or chilling in front of the massive television at city hall enjoy yourself and make the most of it! We look forward to seeing you again in September 🙂

Meanwhile, we will be posting some updates on this site, Twitter and Facebook!
Watch this space for the term card…

This House Would Clone Extinct Species

clone

The 23rd Ordinary Meeting of the Literary and Scientific Society took place on the 8th of May in the Senate Room.

Viorel Vlad, Owen Wright and Beth Malcolmson stood in proposition of cloning extinct species. Vlad stated that many aspects of biology being researched are linked and come together and we won’t know how much we can achieve until we do something. Owen continued by stating that by cloning extinct species we would rectify some of humanities mistakes. By increasing biodiversity we could be lead to medical cures. Malcolmson stated that the fact it is possible is reason enough to clone and that it is a process that will constantly improve. She said it was our responsibility to bring back species but that it should be a heavily regulated process.

Nic Brinza, Nick Millington and Derek Crosby spoke for opposition. Brinza admitted that in the past he got caught up in the awesome prospect of having pet dinosaur but that this just showed our susceptibility to only seeing the good but ignoring the dangers. Millington told the House that all cloning extinct species would do was to perfect the technique, but that our environment would gain nothing by bringing a species back. Crosby’s closing remarks focused on cloning angering God and that’s why he hit dinosaurs with a giant rock and some stuff about humans being a hardcore species covered in the hide of others.

The debate then went to the floor, a vote and the motion passed.

Dufferin Debate: This House Would Colonise the Moon

Lunar base illustration

The 22nd Ordinary Meeting of the 165th Session of the Literific took place on the 1st of May in the Senate Room. It was our Dufferin Prize Debate for Best Speaker of the Society and took the style of British Parliamentary meaning the motion wasn’t known until 15 minutes before the debate.

Ben Murphy and Harry Adair were up for proposition.  Murphy argued that we should fulfil the dreams of past rulers to take over the moon. He said it would be easy as the moon doesn’t have any people and that even though the moon would wreck our immune system, fulfilling wishes was more important and the fact that we’d leave the EU is needed for our empire. Adair told the House that it was our legacy and destiny to continue and explore to learn more about our planet and neighbours. By setting up a home on the moon we would be ensuring that we will be able to continue our species if we destroy our planet.

Fionn Rodgers and Emily Walker opposed the motion. Fionn countered that the British Empire didn’t work out so well. Instead of going to the moon he proposed that we sort out the planet we live on. Emily Walker then closed the debate. She told the House that politics will dissect the moon and would make in a toy for politicians. Instead of allowing this to happen she asked the House to stay on Earth and die together as a proud nation.

The debate then went to the floor, we had a vote and the motion passed. Then the judges came back and announced Harry Adair as our Queen’s Orator for the 165th session.