This House Would Have a New Northern Irish Flag

NIflag

 

The 12th Ordinary meeting of the 165th session of the Literific took place on the 19th of December in the Elmwood Hall. It began with an opening address from the Secretary of State, Theresa Villiers. She talked about the importance of a united community – her entire speech is here as we probably could not do it justice.

Derek Crosby, Dr Dominic Bryan, Ciaran Gallagher and Tina McKenzie spoke in proposition of the motion. Crosby argued that the Union Jack and tricolour both cause divides in the community and suggest there is no Northern Ireland. Dr Bryan said that while dealing with the past was more important, a new flag would do little harm. Mr Gallagher decided that a flag would be a good foundation for progress, for harmony and peace. He commented that a flag is easier to change than the population. Tina McKenzie, NI21, said that the people of Northern Ireland are united in character and that the real problem is Stormont. She told the House that politicians wish to promote segregation.

Nigel Macauley, Conor Conneally, Trevor Ringland and Andrew Carruthers all spoke for the oposition. Macauley countered the idea that leadership needed to bring both communities together through a flag does not exist, that both communities are separated at birth and trying to force them together would cause riots. Conneally said that flags are boring and if both flags cannot be flown with both communities respecting each other then there should be none. Mr Ringland stated that instead of a flag, he asked that real change be made to tackle sectarianism. Carruthers agreed that time should not be wasted on a flag but to instead spend time to make real change, that a flag would just distract from the real problems.

The debate then went to the floor.
We then went to a vote, there were 34 nays, 4 abstentions and the motion passed with 38 ayes.

This House Doesn’t Mind Being Watched

watched

The 4th Ordinary Meeting of the 165th session of the Literific took place on the 24th of October in the Senate Room.

The motion was This House Doesn’t Mind Being Watched.

Ms Evie Netto and Mr Ryan Jones sided with the proposition. Ms Netto argued that safety is a human right that should be taken just as seriously as freedom. She told the House that government surveillance has saved lives and that CCTV is nothing to fear. Mr Jones rationalised that so much of what we do is already in the public domain and that we should take the extra step to allowing government surveillance for our own safety.

Mr George Martin and Mr Henry Adams took to the floor in opposition. Mr Martin explained that he no longer trusts the government and that hem having all our information leaves us in a position to be dominated. He stated if we passed the motion there would be no way to take back our privacy. Mr Henry Adams closed the debate for the opposition. He countered that we shouldn’t be okay with surveillance just because it’s legal as there are many bad laws. He explained that the fact surveillance can be misused and abused is enough reason to not allow it.

Questions were waved and the motion went to a vote.
The motion was defeated.