This House Supports the Right to Die.

right to die

The 19th Ordinary Meeting of the 165th Session of the Literific took place on the 20th of March in the Senate Room.

Vincent Wooding, Jack Thompson and Naomh Gibson spoke in proposition. Wooding argued that it is unfair to trust a person to do things within society but not allow them the ability to choose how they die. Thompson explained active and passive euthanasia to the House and that dying is a phase. He said that doctors have become good at extending the dying phase which is not in the best interests of the patient. Gibson question how learned the proposition were. Instead of worrying about the required model she asked the House to concentrate on the right to control the last part of your life when so much is out of your hands.

Sammy Wade, Nathan Cantley and Nathan Anderson opposed the motion. Wade argued that it would undermine the basic function of the legal and health authorities which exist to protect life. Cantley said that society is confused about the right to die, that there are no guidelines and no framework for us to be able to support it. Anderson said that everyone has their own perspectives on it but that he believed vulnerable people should be given the best possible care as opposed to the right to die.

The floor debate ensued, summaries were heard and after a vote the motion passed.

This House Believes Northern Ireland is Failing Young People

NI

The 2nd Ordinary meeting of the Literific took place on the 10th of October in the Senate Room.

The motion was THB NI is Failing Young People.

Mr Alex Kane, Dr Graham Brownlow and Mr Sam Donaldson took to the floor in proposition of the argument: Mr. Kane declared that the government has not given children the future their parents aspired to, Brownlow told the House that NI is in not grasping economical opportunities or preparing for a future where BRICS will be the man players in trade. Mr. Donaldson concluded that NI has always had serious problems and that it is our own fault. He claimed that the future is bleak and that it is what forces him to drink 😦

Maiden speakers Alexander McCabe and Kim Campbell joined Literific veteran Jonathan Finlay in opposition. Alexander claimed there were three main areas that had to be taken into consideration: education, employment and sectarianism. Ms Campbell used the Ulster Project and the Literific as examples of opportunities available to young people and Mr Finlay concluded by stating that NI is not uniquely failing young people but, instead, all governments are doing so.

The debate then went to the floor.
The motion passed.